Jim Clark
Mindfulness teacher, trainer and supervisor & mindfulness-based CBT therapist
Mindfulness Therapies & London Centre for Mindfulness

Jim Clark RNMH, BA (Hons), PGDip CBT, MSt MBCT (Oxon)

Jim is a registered mental health nurse, a BABCP Accredited CBT Therapist, and a UK Network Listed Mindfulness Teacher. He meets the good practice guidelines for mindfulness teachers, teacher trainers and supervisors.

Jim helped to establish secular mindfulness courses for the public at The London Centre for Mindfulness and continues to support the Centre with teacher training and supervision.

After working for over a decade in the NHS as a mental health nurse and CBT therapist Jim currently offers individual therapy, mindfulness courses, and professional training and supervision through his company Mindfulness Therapies in London. He has extensive training in MBCT, Compassion Focused Therapy, and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. He has taught more than 25 8-week mindfulness courses to different populations, ranging from clinical groups to healthcare staff and the general public. Jim also provides mindfulness teacher training and supervision for the workplace at the IE Business School in Madrid, Spain.

Jim’s interest in mindfulness started with a personal enquiry into Buddhist meditation in 2000, and upon discovering secular based mindfulness approaches he undertook formal mindfulness teacher training, initially with Bangor University, and then a Masters in MBCT with Oxford University. Jim has always had an interest in the relationship between Buddhist Dharma teachings and secular applications of mindfulness. His dissertation was a comparative analysis of the theoretical underpinnings of MBCT and Buddhist psychology, which informs his talk at the Mindfulness Show.


Mindful Living Show Presentation

Saturday 2nd June 2018

Time 12:40-13:10pm

"Mindfulness for wellbeing or awakening? Exploring the scope of practice"

What is our motivation to practice? A talk exploring similarities and differences in the ways that secular mindfulness training and Buddhist meditation view the important task of alleviating human suffering.